Archive for the ‘mobile design’ Tag

A Great Resource for Mobile Learning

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I’ve been doing some research for a paper I’m writing on mobile learning for distribution within my company. As I went through all of the resources I’ve collected, I came back across one that I really think is worthwhile for learning professoinals to have a look at. The book is called “Innovative Mobile Learning Techniques and Technologies” and it’s a collection of studies and resources put together by Hokyoung Ryu and David Parsons at Massey University in New Zealand. The book is available at http://www.igi-global.com/reference/details.asp?id=8262, and I believe it can also be purchased from Amazon. The real value in the book comes from the wide array of studies represented. Everything from text message based quiz systems, podcasts, simulations and mobile games are represented. The pouplations also vary from k-12 students to warehouse employees. I think this book would be great for those who are looking for a set of in-depth studies of mobile learning effectiveness and attitudes about mobile learning. I pasted the table of contents in below so you can see what’s available and that should help you determine whether the book would help you in your project.

Section I
Theoretical Foundations of Mobile Learning Experiences
Chapter I
Designing Learning Activities with Mobile Technologies …………………………………………………………… 1
Hokyoung Ryu, Massey University, New Zealand
David Parsons, Massey University, New Zealand
Chapter II
Transforming the Practice of Mobile Learning: Promoting Pedagogical Innovation through
Educational Principles and Strategies that Work ………………………………………………………………………. 21
Patrick Danaher, University of Southern Queensland, Australia
Raj Gururajan, University of Southern Queensland, Australia
Abdul Hafeez-Baig, University of Southern Queensland, Australia

Section II
Enhancing Individual Learning Experiences
Chapter III
Understanding the Value of Interactive SMS for Large Classes …………………………………………………. 48
Eusebio Scornavacca, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
Sid Huff, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
Stephen Marshall, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
Table of Contents
Chapter IV
Learning by Pervasive Gaming: An Empirical Study ………………………………………………………………… 60
Christian Kittl, evolaris Privatstiftung, Austria & Karl-Franzens University, Austria
Francika Edegger, evolaris Privatstiftung, Austria
Otto Petrovic, evolaris Privatstiftung, Austria & Karl-Franzens University, Austria
Chapter V
iPods as Mobile Multimedia Learning Environments: Individual Differences and
Instructional Design…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 83
Peter E. Dolittle, Virginia Tech, USA
Danielle L. Lusk, Virginia Tech, USA
C. Noel Byrd, Virginia Tech, USA
Gina J. Mariano, Virginia Tech, USA
Chapter VI
From Individual Learning to Collaborative Learning—Location, Fun, and Games: Place, Context,
and Identity in Mobile Learning …………………………………………………………………………………………… 102
Martin Owen, Medrus Learning, UK

Section III
Enhancing Collaborative Learning Experiences
Chapter VII
Collaborative Technology Impacts in Distributed Learning Environments ………………………………… 123
Martha Grabowski, Le Moyne College, USA & Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA
Greg Lepak, Le Moyne College, USA
George Kulick, Le Moyne College, USA
Chapter VIII
Constructing Mobile Technology-Enabled Environments for an Integrated Learning
Approach ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 145
María Felisa Verdejo, Dep. LSI. LTCS Group, UNED, Spain
Carlos Celorrio, Dep. LSI. LTCS Group, UNED, Spain
Emilio Julio Lorenzo, Dep. LSI. LTCS Group, UNED, Spain
Marta Millán, IES Diego Velázquez, Spain
Sergio Prades, Dep. LSI. LTCS Group, UNED, Spain
Javier Vélez, Dep. LSI. LTCS Group, UNED, Spain
Chapter IX
Collaboration in Context as a Framework for Designing Innovative Mobile Learning Activities …. 172
Daniel Spikol, Växjö University, Sweden
Arianit Kurti, Växjö University, Sweden
Marcelo Milrad, Växjö University, Sweden
Chapter X
Participatory Simulation for Collaborative Learning Experiences …………………………………………….. 197
Chengjiu Yin, University of Kyushu, Japan
Hiroaki Ogata, University of Tokushima, Japan
Yoneo Yano, University of Tokushima, Japan

Section IV
Enhancing Situated Learning Experiences
Chapter XI
Situated Learning with SketchMap………………………………………………………………………………………… 216
Sosuke Miura, University of Tokyo, Japan
Pamela Ravasio, University of Tokyo, Japan
Masanori Sugimoto, University of Tokyo, Japan
Chapter XII
An Architecture for a Personalized Mobile Environment to Facilitate Contextual Lifelong
Learning …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 232
Dionisios N. Dimakopoulos, London Knowledge Lab, UK
George D. Magoulas, Birkbeck College, University of London, UK
Chapter XIII
Designing Situated Learning Experiences ……………………………………………………………………………… 255
Hokyoung Ryu, Massey University, New Zealand
Chapter XIV
Developing a Mobile Learning Platform for a Professional Environment…………………………………… 273
Ana Dzartevska, Sand.eld Information Systems, New Zealand

Section V
Challenges and Future Mobile Learning
Chapter XV
Handheld Educational Applications: A Review of the Research ……………………………………………….. 302
Yanjie Song, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Chapter XVI
Assessing the Bene.ts of AJAX in Mobile Learning Systems Design……………………………………….. 324
Feng Xie, Massey University, New Zealand
David Parsons, Massey University, New Zealand
Chapter XVII

Recommended Readings and Resources ……………………………………………………………………………….. 356
Hokyoung Ryu, Massey University, New Zealand
David Parsons, Massey University, New Zealand
Glossary…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 364
Compilation of References ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 371
About the Contributors …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 404
Index………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 412

Mobile Learning Proves Valuable for Military

Mobile Learning with Troops in Iraq and Afganistan

Mobile Learning with Troops in Iraq and Afghanistan

The defense forces of various countries have a long history with mobile technology. In many ways, military uses of mobile technology have blazed trails for advancement in consumer mobile technologies. But in the case of the “VCommunicator” program used by the US Army, we see the military adopting a popular consumer tool to help soldiers learn basic Arabic phrases. The goal of the program is to help soldires communicate in an environment where there are far too few translators.

Here’s a link to an article about the project. This is another example of using mobile learning to it’s strengths.  The VCommunicator program allows soldiers to look up Arabic phrases as they communicate with Iraqi and Afghani civilians, leveraging the just-in-time and situational strengths of mobile learning. However, the colonel named in the article also talks about using the learning tool in a soldiers spare time to train to the point where they don’t need to look up the phrases, i.e. use the tool to train to memory vs. an OJT model. I would imagine the train to memory approach would be best in a situation that could become dangerous and having a consumer favorite like the iPod will provide a comfortable learning environment for the soldiers who use it.

It’s All Coming Together, Enabling Mobile Learning

old mobile phone = Polar Bear

What do these two things have in common? Answer: there’s talk of both of them being extinct in years to come. I would lose much less sleep over the extinction of the old mobile phone though. As I try to keep you up to date on the goings on in the mobile industry, first I have to say again that these events are enablers, not facilitators of mobile learning (i.e. events in the industry will not in and of themselves somehow magically create good m-Learning). Ok, now that I said that, here’s another story outlining how more technology is being integrated into mobile phones and how more “smart phones” are making it to the market. Smart phone sales in the US will double this year from last years number. The way I think about it, more “smart phones” means more capable clients to access the mobile learning we create.

Insites into Mobile User Experience

MEX

Here’s an article called The Mobile User Experience Manifesto for 2008. There are some interesting insights into where the Mobile User Experience group thinks we’re heading in 2008. This is worth a read even if just to see if there predictions come true. I think they’ve done a pretty good job of injecting reality into their manifesto.

Consider the Context

This could be referred to as a stream of consciousness for me. As I sit, poised for another post about mobile learning, I ask this question… Where is mobile learning going as an industry? And I answer… at least some of that.

I see mobile learning as a subset of the broader e-Learning industry. In e-Learning, we continue to see the adoption of gaming and simulation conventions as well as the continued push toward real-time, relevant knowledge on demand. These two trends are just a subset of several trends in design and development in our industry. It’s tempting to think that mobile learning will also take on gaming and simulation techniques, and that we will desire to deliver content that’s quickly accessible and relevant to the environment that the user is currently in (one of the real virtues of mobile learning is that it can be called upon in the very moment that it’s most relevant to the user’s environment).

But all that I have read, suggests that we need to first consider the mobile user. As designers, who also function as business people, we tend to want to reuse things that we’ve already built. We also tend to want to reuse them in a form that is as close to their original form as possible. We don’t always consider how the user will access the content in their environment. In traditional e-Learning design, we assume that the user is at a desk, or somewhere similar with their laptop. While this may not always be the case, we can assume that if the learner is a cable company technician, he is probably not carting around a laptop during his work day, just so he can access the course we created for him. When our learner returns to the office, or his home, he can access the learning. Now, since he’s out of his normal environment, being good designers, we will probably try to create a simulated environment for him. The idea of simulated environments is fine and it often gets the learner closer to feeling like he’s learning on the job or performing on the job when taking an assessment. While this is all well and good, I think one of the real advantages of mobile learning is that it can be accessed when the learner is actually doing his job.

 

So, maybe instead of re-purposing our simulation and shoving it onto the mobile device, we instead use the environment that’s already in existence on our learner’s job. We then use the mobile device to offer easy access to relevant content, at the point of need. Or, we can use the mobile device as the actual guide to performing the tasks at hand. Or, we turn the entire job into an augmented reality game (ARG) where the device serves as the guide, recorder of performance and feedback mechanism as well.

Well, there’s soooo much more to write about the several topics that are covered here. But I will try to organize it better in the future, after all, that’s what we do.

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